Angel & Faith: Library edition Volume 1 (hardcover)
Writer: Christos Gage; Artists: Rebekah Isaacs, Phil Noto, Chris Samnee; Cover: Steve Morris.

Angel & Faith: Library edition Volume 1 (hardcover)

Writer: Christos Gage; Artists: Rebekah Isaacs, Phil Noto, Chris Samnee; Cover: Steve Morris.

whedonesque:

Buffy in HD trailer

1,035 notes   •   August 19 2014, 01:46 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
Buffy 10 #05: New Rules, Part Five
The only worse option than me being in charge is everyone else.
The continuing panels have their focus exclusively on the idea that she doesn’t have to and won’t do it alone. Reading at first, I thought the theme, so directly discussed, sounded a little corny – personally I always prefer the subtle and metaphorical –, and now I think it bothered me mostly for her responsibility on the case being mentioned so briefly, and the (sweet) conclusion coming to interrupt the initial meaning.
The theme responsibility seems to not be so crudely on the spotlight since under Buffy’s earliest journey of acceptance and sacrifices for her destiny (Never Kill a Boy on First Date; Prophecy Girl; Inca Mummy Girl). Then, it only comes under the “one girl in all the world” part of the speech exclusively as Buffy being alone – and mostly being punished about it (When She Was Bad; Becoming, Part 2; The Yoko Factor; Selfless; Empty Places). Loneliness and “arrogance” versus counting on your friends is only one possible conflict when dealing with responsibilities, and I think it was already (over) explored as it was needed.
It’s an extraordinary point Buffy being one of the most long-lived Slayer related to her not being alone, but everybody is and have to be at some points, and that isn’t necessarily a rash, bad, lonely thing with sad, rejected, distant friends. It’s about independence, about confidence. I want to see Buffy facing and creating new rules, with her loved ones, as people who learn to own and be secure about their lives. I want Buffy being in charge and running into the hard choices.

The only worse option than me being in charge is everyone else.

The continuing panels have their focus exclusively on the idea that she doesn’t have to and won’t do it alone. Reading at first, I thought the theme, so directly discussed, sounded a little corny – personally I always prefer the subtle and metaphorical –, and now I think it bothered me mostly for her responsibility on the case being mentioned so briefly, and the (sweet) conclusion coming to interrupt the initial meaning.

The theme responsibility seems to not be so crudely on the spotlight since under Buffy’s earliest journey of acceptance and sacrifices for her destiny (Never Kill a Boy on First Date; Prophecy Girl; Inca Mummy Girl). Then, it only comes under the “one girl in all the world” part of the speech exclusively as Buffy being alone – and mostly being punished about it (When She Was Bad; Becoming, Part 2; The Yoko Factor; Selfless; Empty Places). Loneliness and “arrogance” versus counting on your friends is only one possible conflict when dealing with responsibilities, and I think it was already (over) explored as it was needed.

It’s an extraordinary point Buffy being one of the most long-lived Slayer related to her not being alone, but everybody is and have to be at some points, and that isn’t necessarily a rash, bad, lonely thing with sad, rejected, distant friends. It’s about independence, about confidence. I want to see Buffy facing and creating new rules, with her loved ones, as people who learn to own and be secure about their lives. I want Buffy being in charge and running into the hard choices.

Christos Gage on writing Buffy

EGP: A little earlier you said something about how the more narrowed focus of the book [Abe Sapien] actually creates a greater sense of scale for the universe as a whole, was that something you were initially conscious about?

Christos Gage: Absolutely. Actually, the interesting way that I wound up there is that I’m also the editor on the Buffy books. When we were doing Buffy: The Vampire Slayer Season Eight, the events of the book were kind of world changing and it spilled over into Season Nine. There were things happening that were really changing the whole world but were only seeing it from the point of view of Buffy and her closest friends who were sort of making some it happen. They were dealing with it from the most high-level point of view. I realized over time that, the way the book was set-up, readers couldn’t get a clear sense of what was going on because we were so married to the point of view of Buffy and the gang that they couldn’t see what it was like just for some kid living out in the middle of nowhere. […]

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Hi! Huge fan of your blog, you seem very dedicated! I know you've gotten a few questions regarding the chronology of how to go about the comics, but I was wondering about the reading process itself. Now, I've never read comics before, and it's proving to be more difficult for me than I first imagined. This seems rather dumb now, but how should the pace be? Would I look at the graphics before the dialogue? Should you even in some way analyze the body and facial expressions of the characters?

Hi! Thank you, you are so kind! If you still have any doubt about a question I’ve already tried to answer, there’s no problem asking again, ok?

Now, I have to say it’s a surprisingly interesting and complicated question, since it’s an aspect one doesn’t commonly give much attention, so spontaneous its process generally is. So, the first thing I answer is there is no “should”, it’s your pace, your adaption over time.

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Buffy 10 #06 updated covers

I Wish, Part One

Publication on August 20, 2014

Songs for Buffy Season 8

A short soundtrack from those who brought us season 8 [via]

1) "Bitch Is Back" by Elton John
Chosen by editor and writer Scott Allie

2) “Heaven and Hell” by Black Sabbath
Chosen by letterer Jimmy Betancourt

3) "Defying Gravity" by Idina Menzel
Chosen by artist Georges Jeanty

4) "Black Horse in a Cherry Tree" by KT Tunstall
Chosen by artist Jo Chen

5) "More Than This" by Roxy Music
Chosen by colorist Michelle Madsen

6) "Rotten Hell" by Menomena
Chosen by editor Sierra Hahn

7) "Uniform Grey" by Sarah Harmer
Chosen by executive producer and writer Joss Whedon

1998 Warner Bros advertisment for 1-800-collect: “A Buffy Christmas” - win a role on Buffy TV show. Jessica Johnson, from Maryland, won a three day trip for two to participate of season 3 episode “The Prom”.

In 1999, the WB, Fox Licensing & Publishing, and Barq’s Root Beer team up for the promotion “Barq’s and Buffy Halloween Bash”. Under the tagline “Barq’s has bite”, it offers a chance to win Barq’s products, Buffy clothing and merchandise, and the grand prize: a trip to Hollywood to attend a Halloween party with the Buffy cast and a private screening of season 4 episode “Fear, Itself”.

1,114 notes   •   August 15 2014, 02:20 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE

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